Recent changes Random page
Computers
Gaming
History 
Movies
Politics
Television
see all...
More...

McDonnell-Douglas F/A-18 Hornet

From Canadian Power Wiki

Jump to: navigation, search
An F/A-18C Hornet from VFA-195 "Dambusters" prepares to take off from the aircraft carrier USS America (CV-66).

The McDonnell Douglas (now Boeing) F/A-18 Hornet is a twin-engine supersonic, all-weather carrier-capable multirole fighter jet, designed to dogfight and attack ground targets (F/A designation for Fighter/Attack). Designed by McDonnell Douglas and Northrop, the F/A-18 was derived from the latter's YF-17 in the 1970s for use by the United States Navy and Marine Corps. The Hornet is also used by the air forces of several other nations. It has been the aerial demonstration aircraft for the U.S. Navy's Flight Demonstration Squadron, the Blue Angels, since 1986.

The F/A-18 has a top speed of Mach 1.8. It can carry a wide variety of bombs and missiles, including air-to-air and air-to-ground, supplemented by the 20 mm M61 Vulcan cannon. It is powered by two General Electric F404 turbofan engines, which give the aircraft a high thrust-to-weight ratio. The F/A-18 has excellent aerodynamic characteristics, primarily attributed to its leading edge extensions (LEX). The fighter's primary missions are fighter escort, fleet air defense, Suppression of Enemy Air Defenses (SEAD), air interdiction, close air support and aerial reconnaissance. Its versatility and reliability have proven it to be a valuable carrier asset, though it has been criticized for its lack of range and payload compared to its earlier contemporaries, such as the Grumman F-14 Tomcat in the fighter and strike fighter role, and the Grumman A-6 Intruder and LTV A-7 Corsair II in the attack role.

Canada ordered 138 Hornets directly from McDonnell Douglas, which were delivered as the CF-188A and CF-188B Hornets. These featured wingtip fences, high-powered lamps to illuminate intercepted aircraft, and other adaptions for Arctic Operations. By the 2000s, they had been retrofitted to F/A-18C/D specifications, including improved engines, upgraded avionics, and the ability to fire missiles such as the AIM-120 AMRAAM.

The F/A-18 Hornet provided the baseline design for the Boeing F/A-18E/F Super Hornet, a larger, evolutionary redesign of the F/A-18. Compared to the Hornet, the Super Hornet is larger, heavier and has improved range and payload. The F/A-18E/F was originally proposed as an alternative to an all-new aircraft to replace existing dedicated attack aircraft such as the A-6. The larger variant was also directed to replace the aging Grumman F-14 Tomcat (although the F-35 replaced the A-6F and the F-14E Supercat replaced the F-14A/B/D), thus serving a complementary role with Hornets in the U.S. Navy, and serving a wider range of roles including refueling tanker. The Boeing EA-18G Growler electronic jamming platform was also developed from the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet.

Users[edit]

Share this article: